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Have You Tried Canada’s National Dishes?

As a newcomer to Canada, you must try some of the unique foods from this country. Below are a few must-tries along with a few regional selections.

POUTINE

The quintessential Canadian dish, made of French fries topped with cheese curds and light brown gravy. The prolificacy of the dish has spawned whole restaurants dedicated to the dish, creating hundreds of regional varieties like topping it with bacon, steak, mushrooms, sausage, peppers, and more.

NANAIMO BARS

The nanaimo bar, named after the Vancouver Island city in BC, is Canada’s national dessert and confectionary, with a wafer crumb-based layer at the bottom, melted chocolate squares on top and custard flavoured butter icing in between. You can find these at most Canadian bakeries and cafes.

MAPLE SYRUP

The maple leaf is not only on our national flag but also represents one of Toronto’s major sports teams. So of course maple syrup, a concentrate of sap from sugar maple trees, is amongst our national dishes. Pour over pancakes, drizzle some on your fruits and yogurt, or cook it with bacon (another Canadian classic).

PEAMEAL BACON

Known as Canadian bacon outside of the country, Peameal bacon is not from the fatty belly but rather the loin. Developed by a Toronto ham curer, he meat is wet cured in brine and rolled into cornmeal. To try the best peameal bacon sandwich, visit the St. Lawrence Market.

MONTREAL SMOKED MEAT

This delicacy is made with brisket that is spiced, cured, and then hot smoked. It is typically served in a sandwich with yellow mustard. Many shops in Toronto sells Montreal smoked meat sandwiches, such as Caplansky’s and many Jewish delis in the city.

BEAVERTAILS

A fried dough pastry from Ottawa that’s like a donut but without the hole and topped with a vast variety of sweets and candies. The dough is hand stretched to resemble the tail of a beaver (Canada’s national animal). You can find Beavertails at food trucks around Toronto.

KETCHUP CHIPS

This is one potato chip flavour that you will see all over Canadian grocery stores but rarely find outside of the country.

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